The new buidling for Gateway Primary Free School, Tilbury, open to pupils and staff

New chapter – headteacher Thom Martin with some of the pupils dressed for Book Day

New chapter – headteacher Thom Martin with some of the pupils dressed for Book Day

First published in News

A MULTI-MILLION pound building has been opened for pupils and staff at Thurrock’s first free school.

The Gateway Primary Free School, on the site of Gateway Academy, in Marshfoot Road, opened to Year Six pupils in September 2012.

Foundation pupils, aged four and five, joined last year, with both year groups using classrooms in the academy building.

Now, the free school has its own building, with classrooms that are equipped with interactive TV screens and the latest computer technology.

From September, the school will be ready to take primary school children of all ages.

The £7.5million project will enable pupils and staff to share resources with the academy, as well as Lansdowne Primary Academy, in Tilbury, and Herringham Primary Academy, in Chadwell St Mary.

All the schools are run by the Ormiston Trust as part of the Gateway Learning Community.

Tilbury Manor Primary School, in Dickens Avenue, is set to join them, and will become an academy next month.

The plan will see Tilbury Manor and the free school become a twoform entry primary school.

Kevin Sadler, chief executive of the Gateway Learning Community, said: “This is the end of a lot of work, but the beginning of the real work, because this is all about raising standards, raising attitudes towards learning and raising aspirations.

“We’re working collaboratively, which is what our leaning community is all about, providing local solutions to the local problems.”

The new building features a slide from the foundation class straight into the playground and a giant screen in the reception area promoting events at the school and providing a live news feed.

Thom Martin, headteacher at the free school, said he was thrilled as the building opened.

He said: “I feel a bit overwhelmed with what we’ve got here. We’ve been waiting for it for so long. The children are thrilled, too.

"They’d never seen it before, despite being in such close proximity to it. We’ve gone from having such little space to something so enormous.”

ThurrockMPJackie Doyle-Price said the facilities on offer and the free school and academy system were the way forward for education in the borough.

She said: “When I first met Kevin Sadler he had these ambitious plans for a primary school. The council said ‘you can’t do that, we need secondary schools, and wouldn’t get involved’.

“We said ‘no, they (Gateway Learning Community) can do both’, and here we are.”

Comments (8)

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4:26pm Fri 14 Mar 14

Jack222 says...

The issue remains. It's home background which makes all the difference. (Yes, the strongest predictor of how well a child does at school is the home - did the parents go to University then that's the strongest predictor by far of whether a child will go as those parents know about using books, language, intelligent films, visits to London to the National Gallery and so on).The school is merely the icing on the cake...

Politicians don't like saying this because it means if the child is doing poorly at school it's the parents' fault and parents don't like that and parents vote...
The issue remains. It's home background which makes all the difference. (Yes, the strongest predictor of how well a child does at school is the home - did the parents go to University then that's the strongest predictor by far of whether a child will go as those parents know about using books, language, intelligent films, visits to London to the National Gallery and so on).The school is merely the icing on the cake... Politicians don't like saying this because it means if the child is doing poorly at school it's the parents' fault and parents don't like that and parents vote... Jack222
  • Score: 3

5:08pm Fri 14 Mar 14

Dave_ says...

Jack, the amount that parents are willing and able to support their children, not their education background is the important thing. Neither my wife or I went to university and we were more than able to support our children from day one to when they left education and beyond. In fact I would say we did a pretty good job all in all and if anything found teachers lacking in basic skills and knowledge.

I know a number of university educated types and or senior in their workplace who aren’t able to personally support their children and buy in day to day educational support. This in my opnion is laughable. When our children were in Primary school one dad who was well educated and high flyer at work (not that he ever told anyone), said at a meeting he and his wife struggled to help their child with their English and Maths. I nearly fell off my chair and stifled a smirk.
Jack, the amount that parents are willing and able to support their children, not their education background is the important thing. Neither my wife or I went to university and we were more than able to support our children from day one to when they left education and beyond. In fact I would say we did a pretty good job all in all and if anything found teachers lacking in basic skills and knowledge. I know a number of university educated types and or senior in their workplace who aren’t able to personally support their children and buy in day to day educational support. This in my opnion is laughable. When our children were in Primary school one dad who was well educated and high flyer at work (not that he ever told anyone), said at a meeting he and his wife struggled to help their child with their English and Maths. I nearly fell off my chair and stifled a smirk. Dave_
  • Score: 0

7:17pm Fri 14 Mar 14

rocket1 says...

i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk.
i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk. rocket1
  • Score: -2

8:48am Sat 15 Mar 14

Dave_ says...

While I do think that parents have to be involved, talking to people with children in school at the moment it does seem that schools are 'keen' to shift the burden via homework/doing things at home to the parents to the point where they wonder what they actually do in school. Listening to them I can't remember my mum or dad (and neither can my wife remember hers) sitting doing or checking that I had any or done my homework. Not that I got any at Primary and not huge amounts at Secondary. Lord knows how I managed to get 9 O Levels and 2 A Levels, under the old system of doing your exams in one sitting after learning things.
I tend to remember going into school each day, sitting a classroom with the teachers teaching and doing work and going home to play with friends. Schools concentrated on education.
While I do think that parents have to be involved, talking to people with children in school at the moment it does seem that schools are 'keen' to shift the burden via homework/doing things at home to the parents to the point where they wonder what they actually do in school. Listening to them I can't remember my mum or dad (and neither can my wife remember hers) sitting doing or checking that I had any or done my homework. Not that I got any at Primary and not huge amounts at Secondary. Lord knows how I managed to get 9 O Levels and 2 A Levels, under the old system of doing your exams in one sitting after learning things. I tend to remember going into school each day, sitting a classroom with the teachers teaching and doing work and going home to play with friends. Schools concentrated on education. Dave_
  • Score: -1

6:00pm Sun 16 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

rocket1 wrote:
i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk.
The child is the barometer of the home!

I’ve never taught a ‘normal’ pupil with dysfunctional parents and vice-versa!

Before any boy or girl is a student, they are their parents’ son or daughter first and foremost!

“If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort and keep on learning” (Dweck 2008).

And one for you rocket!...with fewer syllables! “For a child , love is spelt T-I-M-E” (Ziglar 1985)! So think when you next go down road, cash giro, go get blasted, go back home and hit the wife…because you’re a clueless b*****d!
[quote][p][bold]rocket1[/bold] wrote: i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk.[/p][/quote]The child is the barometer of the home! I’ve never taught a ‘normal’ pupil with dysfunctional parents and vice-versa! Before any boy or girl is a student, they are their parents’ son or daughter first and foremost! “If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort and keep on learning” (Dweck 2008). And one for you rocket!...with fewer syllables! “For a child , love is spelt T-I-M-E” (Ziglar 1985)! So think when you next go down road, cash giro, go get blasted, go back home and hit the wife…because you’re a clueless b*****d! E.C.M.
  • Score: 0

10:32pm Sun 16 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

Dave_ wrote:
While I do think that parents have to be involved, talking to people with children in school at the moment it does seem that schools are 'keen' to shift the burden via homework/doing things at home to the parents to the point where they wonder what they actually do in school. Listening to them I can't remember my mum or dad (and neither can my wife remember hers) sitting doing or checking that I had any or done my homework. Not that I got any at Primary and not huge amounts at Secondary. Lord knows how I managed to get 9 O Levels and 2 A Levels, under the old system of doing your exams in one sitting after learning things. I tend to remember going into school each day, sitting a classroom with the teachers teaching and doing work and going home to play with friends. Schools concentrated on education.
Davy Baby, long gone are the days when "schools concentrated on education"!

Gove, Wilshire and Ofsted have no interest in 'education'...they simply promote 'qualifications' (there's a huge difference you know!) and champion the 'examination factories' that generate them!
[quote][p][bold]Dave_[/bold] wrote: While I do think that parents have to be involved, talking to people with children in school at the moment it does seem that schools are 'keen' to shift the burden via homework/doing things at home to the parents to the point where they wonder what they actually do in school. Listening to them I can't remember my mum or dad (and neither can my wife remember hers) sitting doing or checking that I had any or done my homework. Not that I got any at Primary and not huge amounts at Secondary. Lord knows how I managed to get 9 O Levels and 2 A Levels, under the old system of doing your exams in one sitting after learning things. I tend to remember going into school each day, sitting a classroom with the teachers teaching and doing work and going home to play with friends. Schools concentrated on education.[/p][/quote]Davy Baby, long gone are the days when "schools concentrated on education"! Gove, Wilshire and Ofsted have no interest in 'education'...they simply promote 'qualifications' (there's a huge difference you know!) and champion the 'examination factories' that generate them! E.C.M.
  • Score: 1

9:59am Tue 18 Mar 14

rocket1 says...

E.C.M. wrote:
rocket1 wrote:
i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk.
The child is the barometer of the home!

I’ve never taught a ‘normal’ pupil with dysfunctional parents and vice-versa!

Before any boy or girl is a student, they are their parents’ son or daughter first and foremost!

“If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort and keep on learning” (Dweck 2008).

And one for you rocket!...with fewer syllables! “For a child , love is spelt T-I-M-E” (Ziglar 1985)! So think when you next go down road, cash giro, go get blasted, go back home and hit the wife…because you’re a clueless b*****d!
ha ha ha,i have really poked you in the eye,that failed teacher crack really hit home.
[quote][p][bold]E.C.M.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rocket1[/bold] wrote: i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk.[/p][/quote]The child is the barometer of the home! I’ve never taught a ‘normal’ pupil with dysfunctional parents and vice-versa! Before any boy or girl is a student, they are their parents’ son or daughter first and foremost! “If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort and keep on learning” (Dweck 2008). And one for you rocket!...with fewer syllables! “For a child , love is spelt T-I-M-E” (Ziglar 1985)! So think when you next go down road, cash giro, go get blasted, go back home and hit the wife…because you’re a clueless b*****d![/p][/quote]ha ha ha,i have really poked you in the eye,that failed teacher crack really hit home. rocket1
  • Score: -1

1:22pm Tue 18 Mar 14

E.C.M. says...

rocket1 wrote:
E.C.M. wrote:
rocket1 wrote:
i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk.
The child is the barometer of the home!

I’ve never taught a ‘normal’ pupil with dysfunctional parents and vice-versa!

Before any boy or girl is a student, they are their parents’ son or daughter first and foremost!

“If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort and keep on learning” (Dweck 2008).

And one for you rocket!...with fewer syllables! “For a child , love is spelt T-I-M-E” (Ziglar 1985)! So think when you next go down road, cash giro, go get blasted, go back home and hit the wife…because you’re a clueless b*****d!
ha ha ha,i have really poked you in the eye,that failed teacher crack really hit home.
rocket1, first rule of comedy...be funny!

Is there such a thing as a failed teacher? Someone who has studied and been through the education system themselves, ticking all the boxes becomes 'qualified' to teach! What constitutes a 'failed teacher' pray tell?

Why couldn't/wouldn't you teach?
[quote][p][bold]rocket1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]E.C.M.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rocket1[/bold] wrote: i think jack222 should work for ofsted,he could teach a few truths about education to so called professionals,like ECM and his ilk.[/p][/quote]The child is the barometer of the home! I’ve never taught a ‘normal’ pupil with dysfunctional parents and vice-versa! Before any boy or girl is a student, they are their parents’ son or daughter first and foremost! “If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort and keep on learning” (Dweck 2008). And one for you rocket!...with fewer syllables! “For a child , love is spelt T-I-M-E” (Ziglar 1985)! So think when you next go down road, cash giro, go get blasted, go back home and hit the wife…because you’re a clueless b*****d![/p][/quote]ha ha ha,i have really poked you in the eye,that failed teacher crack really hit home.[/p][/quote]rocket1, first rule of comedy...be funny! Is there such a thing as a failed teacher? Someone who has studied and been through the education system themselves, ticking all the boxes becomes 'qualified' to teach! What constitutes a 'failed teacher' pray tell? Why couldn't/wouldn't you teach? E.C.M.
  • Score: 0

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