One in four children, aged 10, are officially obese

Thurrock Gazette: One in four children, aged 10, are officially obese One in four children, aged 10, are officially obese

MORE than a quarter of Thurrock’s ten-year-olds are obese, shock new figures have revealed.

Thurrock council’s annual health report also told how more than 25 percent of adults are in the same category.

And it revealed how one in five children live in poverty - and one in eight women smoke during pregnancy.

Labour’s Barbara Rice, the councillor responsible for health, said: “The obesity rate is appalling and when children live in poverty, there is more obesity and we have a lot of our kids living in poverty.

“We can see from this picture that we have a long way to go to reduce health inequalities and improve the health and wellbeing of our communities.”

The report, presented at the latest full council meeting, also showed men living in the Orsett ward are likely to live EIGHT years longer than someone living in one of Thurrock’s most deprived wards, such as Tilbury St Chads.

Compared to similar sized boroughs across Britain, Thurrock has one of the highest rates of premature deaths from cancer, heart disease, strokes and lung disease.

Shane Hebb, the Conservative’s spokesman on health, couldn’t believe the difference in life expectancy between Thurrock’s most and least deprived wards.

He said: “What a tragedy.

“The dreadful difference between life expectancy in our least and most deprived areas rears its ugly head again at 8.3 years!

“This report tells us the facts, now we must do something about it.”

Responding to the shocking statistics on Twitter, resident Jacqui Faras said: “That’s so shocking and sad.”

Another Elizabeth Stevens said: “My heart is breaking. This is our borough, our towns, our kids and our future.”

The council has now outlined 12 priorities to tackle Thurrock’s health woes, which include working more closely with schools and developing a “healthy weight and tobacco control strategies” next year.

Grim facts:

*25.1 per cent of the borough’s ten to 11-year-olds are obese - compared to 19 per cent nationally

*28 per cent of adults living in Thurrock are obese - nationally it’s 24 per cent.

*12 per cent of women in Thurrock continue to smoke while pregnant - nationally: 13.7 per cent.

*21.9 per cent of children living in poverty - the national figure is the same.

Comments (9)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:16am Fri 1 Nov 13

The Stinker Returns says...

I hope that's not a 10 year old pushing the pram!
I hope that's not a 10 year old pushing the pram! The Stinker Returns
  • Score: 4

11:15am Fri 1 Nov 13

Marcus P says...

There is a direct correlation between health and socio economic class. Working class people tend to lead less healthy lifestyles in terms of diet, smoking and exercise than middle class people.

Thurrock has a large working class community and as such will be more likely to suffer health issues.

It is as simple as that. There is no tax payer funded magic wand available to solve this.
There is a direct correlation between health and socio economic class. Working class people tend to lead less healthy lifestyles in terms of diet, smoking and exercise than middle class people. Thurrock has a large working class community and as such will be more likely to suffer health issues. It is as simple as that. There is no tax payer funded magic wand available to solve this. Marcus P
  • Score: 5

12:14pm Fri 1 Nov 13

d_2da_ougle says...

marcus you got the classes in thurrock messed up there are no working class, the only 2 classes in thurrock are working class which are a small number and sponges mate, the working class are less likely to suffer feom health problems because working actually promotes good lifestyle where as the other are mostly obease stroke victims in waiting
marcus you got the classes in thurrock messed up there are no working class, the only 2 classes in thurrock are working class which are a small number and sponges mate, the working class are less likely to suffer feom health problems because working actually promotes good lifestyle where as the other are mostly obease stroke victims in waiting d_2da_ougle
  • Score: 2

12:20pm Fri 1 Nov 13

deeamano says...

why I can see the parents only to fish and chips shop? in thurrock a lot of people are on benefits and they don't even bother to cook healthy food, they just buy fast food. that's there problem. mothers are too lazy!!!
why I can see the parents only to fish and chips shop? in thurrock a lot of people are on benefits and they don't even bother to cook healthy food, they just buy fast food. that's there problem. mothers are too lazy!!! deeamano
  • Score: 3

10:13am Sat 2 Nov 13

Dave_ says...

Define a premature death? What age benchmark do you use to determine anything age related as being premature?
Cancer no one can control that. Do we have more cases of cancer due to higher detection rates? Are people genetically predisposed?
Lung disease without further qualification as to cause, we do live in an area which was highly industrialised, which may be contributing factor.
Heart disease, what is/are the definitive cause(s), are people predisposed to it?
Stroke are as far as I’m aware completely random events. But again you may be predisposed?
Unless these are answered you can't even begin to address the problems.

The obesity thing is to an extent genetic and down to the fact we all live a far more sedentary lifestyle than our forebears and all have access to more food. In years gone by we lived a far more manual life and would have burnt the calories ingested. The home and workplaces have become increasingly sedentary as technology has taken over. Unless we have an apocalyptic event we aren’t going to go back to those supposed halcyon days and just telling people you must do this or else, ain’t gonna work.

If you then look at children today, how many times do you walk by a park or rec and see “jumpers for goalposts” or kids out and about, not very often? Why not because parents have been made wary of letting them out because of the “watch out, watch out there’s a paedo about” mentality, the fear of them being ‘mugged’ for money and other things and when kids are out in groups and about just being kids, as we were, they are treated with suspicion, because us older people have forgotten what we got up to when they were kids.

What can be done to prevent all of these things not a lot. Politicians maybe able to throw money at some of the housing in the ‘deprived’ areas which maybe a contributing factor. But then again the mindset of some who live in the ‘deprived’ areas needs to be addressed. I’ve visited friends in Tilbury and just driving around there is a sense that some have given up. Is it normal for instance to have indoor furniture just sitting in front gardens and or overgrown front gardens looking like the wilds of Africa? In some places furniture broken up and strewn everywhere.
I’m not saying this is unique to Tilbury but it’s what I’ve seen. Unless in my opinion you can break the mentality that this is somehow regarded as normal, you can’t even begin to address the other things.

As for the reaction to children being allowed to be children, it is too ingrained over 20 or so years of media hype that they will be abducted or similar, to change back to a time when kids were just that. Parents are not going to be that willing to let them out of their sight. So blame politicians and the media.

When you look at people’s eating habits and try and blame that, in my lifetime we have gone from there only being a chippy and maybe Indian/Chinese takeway, to now where there is a plethora of choice on the High St and at the retail parks, which is mirrored on supermarket shelves. Unless they are going to make these ridiculously expensive or force them to close or reduce choice, then you are not going to make one iota of difference. In life you take the easy option and takeaway food is just one of them. Like the car is, over walking or cycling or the bus.
Define a premature death? What age benchmark do you use to determine anything age related as being premature? Cancer no one can control that. Do we have more cases of cancer due to higher detection rates? Are people genetically predisposed? Lung disease without further qualification as to cause, we do live in an area which was highly industrialised, which may be contributing factor. Heart disease, what is/are the definitive cause(s), are people predisposed to it? Stroke are as far as I’m aware completely random events. But again you may be predisposed? Unless these are answered you can't even begin to address the problems. The obesity thing is to an extent genetic and down to the fact we all live a far more sedentary lifestyle than our forebears and all have access to more food. In years gone by we lived a far more manual life and would have burnt the calories ingested. The home and workplaces have become increasingly sedentary as technology has taken over. Unless we have an apocalyptic event we aren’t going to go back to those supposed halcyon days and just telling people you must do this or else, ain’t gonna work. If you then look at children today, how many times do you walk by a park or rec and see “jumpers for goalposts” or kids out and about, not very often? Why not because parents have been made wary of letting them out because of the “watch out, watch out there’s a paedo about” mentality, the fear of them being ‘mugged’ for money and other things and when kids are out in groups and about just being kids, as we were, they are treated with suspicion, because us older people have forgotten what we got up to when they were kids. What can be done to prevent all of these things not a lot. Politicians maybe able to throw money at some of the housing in the ‘deprived’ areas which maybe a contributing factor. But then again the mindset of some who live in the ‘deprived’ areas needs to be addressed. I’ve visited friends in Tilbury and just driving around there is a sense that some have given up. Is it normal for instance to have indoor furniture just sitting in front gardens and or overgrown front gardens looking like the wilds of Africa? In some places furniture broken up and strewn everywhere. I’m not saying this is unique to Tilbury but it’s what I’ve seen. Unless in my opinion you can break the mentality that this is somehow regarded as normal, you can’t even begin to address the other things. As for the reaction to children being allowed to be children, it is too ingrained over 20 or so years of media hype that they will be abducted or similar, to change back to a time when kids were just that. Parents are not going to be that willing to let them out of their sight. So blame politicians and the media. When you look at people’s eating habits and try and blame that, in my lifetime we have gone from there only being a chippy and maybe Indian/Chinese takeway, to now where there is a plethora of choice on the High St and at the retail parks, which is mirrored on supermarket shelves. Unless they are going to make these ridiculously expensive or force them to close or reduce choice, then you are not going to make one iota of difference. In life you take the easy option and takeaway food is just one of them. Like the car is, over walking or cycling or the bus. Dave_
  • Score: 0

6:58am Mon 4 Nov 13

Dave_ says...

Marcus P wrote:
There is a direct correlation between health and socio economic class. Working class people tend to lead less healthy lifestyles in terms of diet, smoking and exercise than middle class people.

Thurrock has a large working class community and as such will be more likely to suffer health issues.

It is as simple as that. There is no tax payer funded magic wand available to solve this.
Putting this purely down to socio/economic class thing and aiming at the lower end is media inspired.
I know plenty of "middle class" types who eat out, buy (normally delivered) takeaway, convenience foods and drink what I would regard as excessive amounts, never without a glass of wine or beer and some smoke. They live "busy lives", don't exercise (but have a gym membership as status symbol) and don't have the time to cook properly, despite having state of the art/fashionable/show
room kitchens and all the gizmos. All the gear and no idea, in my opinion.
The fact you have the statistical difference between Orsett and Tilbury, is probably more to do with general living conditions. Tilbury primarily social/rented housng; Orsett primarily privately owned. In the former you have to wait for the council/landlord to get round to rectify problems and the latter, you pay out for things to be fixed.
Reports like this make broad sweeping judgements and don't look deep enough.
[quote][p][bold]Marcus P[/bold] wrote: There is a direct correlation between health and socio economic class. Working class people tend to lead less healthy lifestyles in terms of diet, smoking and exercise than middle class people. Thurrock has a large working class community and as such will be more likely to suffer health issues. It is as simple as that. There is no tax payer funded magic wand available to solve this.[/p][/quote]Putting this purely down to socio/economic class thing and aiming at the lower end is media inspired. I know plenty of "middle class" types who eat out, buy (normally delivered) takeaway, convenience foods and drink what I would regard as excessive amounts, never without a glass of wine or beer and some smoke. They live "busy lives", don't exercise (but have a gym membership as status symbol) and don't have the time to cook properly, despite having state of the art/fashionable/show room kitchens and all the gizmos. All the gear and no idea, in my opinion. The fact you have the statistical difference between Orsett and Tilbury, is probably more to do with general living conditions. Tilbury primarily social/rented housng; Orsett primarily privately owned. In the former you have to wait for the council/landlord to get round to rectify problems and the latter, you pay out for things to be fixed. Reports like this make broad sweeping judgements and don't look deep enough. Dave_
  • Score: 1

8:33pm Mon 4 Nov 13

Marcus P says...

Dave_ wrote:
Marcus P wrote: There is a direct correlation between health and socio economic class. Working class people tend to lead less healthy lifestyles in terms of diet, smoking and exercise than middle class people. Thurrock has a large working class community and as such will be more likely to suffer health issues. It is as simple as that. There is no tax payer funded magic wand available to solve this.
Putting this purely down to socio/economic class thing and aiming at the lower end is media inspired. I know plenty of "middle class" types who eat out, buy (normally delivered) takeaway, convenience foods and drink what I would regard as excessive amounts, never without a glass of wine or beer and some smoke. They live "busy lives", don't exercise (but have a gym membership as status symbol) and don't have the time to cook properly, despite having state of the art/fashionable/show room kitchens and all the gizmos. All the gear and no idea, in my opinion. The fact you have the statistical difference between Orsett and Tilbury, is probably more to do with general living conditions. Tilbury primarily social/rented housng; Orsett primarily privately owned. In the former you have to wait for the council/landlord to get round to rectify problems and the latter, you pay out for things to be fixed. Reports like this make broad sweeping judgements and don't look deep enough.
There have been numerous research projects done ove the years proving the link between health and socio economic class The report findings in Thurrock confirm this.

There is no magic solution that can be conjured up by some Thurrock Council health "expert".
[quote][p][bold]Dave_[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marcus P[/bold] wrote: There is a direct correlation between health and socio economic class. Working class people tend to lead less healthy lifestyles in terms of diet, smoking and exercise than middle class people. Thurrock has a large working class community and as such will be more likely to suffer health issues. It is as simple as that. There is no tax payer funded magic wand available to solve this.[/p][/quote]Putting this purely down to socio/economic class thing and aiming at the lower end is media inspired. I know plenty of "middle class" types who eat out, buy (normally delivered) takeaway, convenience foods and drink what I would regard as excessive amounts, never without a glass of wine or beer and some smoke. They live "busy lives", don't exercise (but have a gym membership as status symbol) and don't have the time to cook properly, despite having state of the art/fashionable/show room kitchens and all the gizmos. All the gear and no idea, in my opinion. The fact you have the statistical difference between Orsett and Tilbury, is probably more to do with general living conditions. Tilbury primarily social/rented housng; Orsett primarily privately owned. In the former you have to wait for the council/landlord to get round to rectify problems and the latter, you pay out for things to be fixed. Reports like this make broad sweeping judgements and don't look deep enough.[/p][/quote]There have been numerous research projects done ove the years proving the link between health and socio economic class The report findings in Thurrock confirm this. There is no magic solution that can be conjured up by some Thurrock Council health "expert". Marcus P
  • Score: 0

4:48pm Tue 5 Nov 13

Dave_ says...

I would suggest that the affluent live just as unhealthily as the not so well off, it's just the studies wouldn't pick this up, as they probably look at things like income and a ratio of total : disposable income and use that as a starting point, which then skews the data.
The affluent will drink to excess, eat to excess, smoke and more so than the lower end, because they can afford it without impingng on other things too much. However if you live in a cramped dirty/damp run down environment you are more likel to suffer more poor health than if you live in an open clean environment, regardless of the general lifestyle.
I would suggest that the affluent live just as unhealthily as the not so well off, it's just the studies wouldn't pick this up, as they probably look at things like income and a ratio of total : disposable income and use that as a starting point, which then skews the data. The affluent will drink to excess, eat to excess, smoke and more so than the lower end, because they can afford it without impingng on other things too much. However if you live in a cramped dirty/damp run down environment you are more likel to suffer more poor health than if you live in an open clean environment, regardless of the general lifestyle. Dave_
  • Score: 0

5:05pm Wed 6 Nov 13

Thurrockbob says...

'One in four children, aged 10, are officially obese'!

And so are their parents.
'One in four children, aged 10, are officially obese'! And so are their parents. Thurrockbob
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree